Amazon.com Widgets
AutsonSlideshow-01 AutsonSlideshow-02 AutsonSlideshow-03 AutsonSlideshow-04 AutsonSlideshow-05 AutsonSlideshow-06 AutsonSlideshow-07 AutsonSlideshow-08 AutsonSlideshow-09 AutsonSlideshow-10 AutsonSlideshow-11 AutsonSlideshow-12 AutsonSlideshow-13 AutsonSlideshow-14 AutsonSlideshow-15 AutsonSlideshow-16

COURSE NO. MAT-454

Would you like this course added to your child's academic packet? Send your request through Mavenlink. Be sure to mention the student, course number, and the quarter you wish to start the course.

COURSE OVERVIEW

This is not a course, but instead an article detailing the Math Study Card method.  Math Study Cards should be incorporated into your student’s main math course, starting especially with Math U See Zeta or Saxon 76 and up.

COURSE NOTES

NOTE: This is not a course, but instead an article detailing the Math Study Card method.  Math Study Cards should be incorporated into your student’s main math course, starting especially with Math U See Zeta or Saxon 76 and up.
 
 
We’ve done a lot of talking about “math study cards” on the phone this year.  Math study cards work the same way as flipping back in the text would, but they are much easier to use, they are especially focused on what is necessary to memorize, they are done in the student’s own handwriting so they are friendlier, they can be used as daily oral quizzes, they can be added on as an oral quiz section to an already established math test to check for deep mastery of meanings and formulae, they can help keep Mom’s blood pressure in check…
 
Math Study Cards are flashcards made using 3 x 5 index cards.  The student should develop them himself, as much as possible.  On one side of the card, have him enter a visual prompt of some kind: (1) a math vocabulary word, (2) a math symbol, (3) a math formula, (4) a math maxim with blanks left where you want the kids to fill in the words verbally, (5) or a notated sample solution problem.  On the other side of the card have him enter the definition to the vocabulary word (for example, one side of the card says “sum” and the other side says “answer to an addition problem”), or the name of the math symbol (for example, “plus” or “not equal to”) or the name of the formula (for example, “Rule of 4 for multiplication” or “circumference”), or the verbal responses to the blanks (for example, “The order of operations in multi-operational problems is…” is entered on one side of the index card and PARENTHESES, EXPONENTS, MULTIPLICATION, DIVISION, ADDITION, SUBTRACTION is entered on the other side.  Be sure to leave six blanks on the front of the card for your student.), or the label for the notated problem (for example, “Long Division”).  Use color or graphics to add emphasis and interest.  
 
Hole-punch these cards and thread them onto metal snap-together rings.  Let the student use these cards any time they are doing math (or grammar or composition or literature—study cards work everywhere!).  Rotate cards in and out of the rings as necessary.  Put the cards away for tests.
 
Have a card made whenever you see the need for one.  Watch for these clues:  veins popping out of your neck, Mom, as you hiss, “How many times do I have to tell you…!”  If the student consistently misses a certain type of problem, have them cut-and-paste the book’s notated example problem onto a card and then have them label the problem or enter the steps in verbal format on the back of the card.  Or if the student consistently can’t remember which operation to use in a word problem, have them write a representative word problem in its simplest form on the front of a card and enter the operation to use on the back of the card.  For example, on the front of the card is “Roy spent $9 per week on gas.  How much did he spend in 8 weeks?”  On the back of the card is noted “Multiply”.  Add some cards temporarily until the student has the steps or operation choice deeply and easily memorized, especially for the student who has math anxiety or low tolerance for frustration.  Indeed, it doesn’t hurt to add a card for a while any time he’s had to work the same problem more than twice to win through to the correct answer.  
 

Credit Information for Students in Grades 9 - 12: Do not report this as a separate course. Flashcard work is considered part of your main math course.

Scheduling Suggestions: as needed



BOOKS AND MATERIALS

 

No text required.

  • ISBN:        
  • Supplier: None.

 



 

 




LESSON PLANNER

WEEK A

Preparatory Week A: Use this school week to gather the materials for this course and thoroughly read the book notes, course notes, and, if applicable, the weekly lesson plan in your St. Thomas Aquinas Academy curriculum guide.


WEEK B

Preparatory Week B: Use this school week to complete Preparatory Week A and explore the materials for this course. Flip through all of this course’s materials. Make mental notes about the design and organization the resources for the course (editor’s notes, table of contents, maps, charts, forms, appendices, glossaries, bibliographies, end notes, internet supports, etc.).


WEEK 1

 


WEEK 2

 


WEEK 3

 


WEEK 4

 


WEEK 5

 


WEEK 6

 


WEEK 7

 


WEEK 8

 


WEEK 9

 


WEEK 10

 


WEEK 11

 


WEEK 12

 


WEEK 13

 


WEEK 14

 


WEEK 15

 


WEEK 16

 




ATTACHMENTS AND COMMENTS

SUBSCRIBE